Make the Export Sale Shipping Basics

Plan Your Market Entry Strategy: U.S. Export Regulations

Determine a Products Export Potential

Get Ready to Export: My Export Plan

Plan Your Market Entry Strategy: Research the Global Market Place

Plan Your Market Entry Strategy: Selecting Initial Export Markets

Success Story: Advanced Superabrasives

Success Story: Advanced Superabrasives

Finding Foreign Buyers: Trade Missions

Finding Foreign Buyers: Trade Shows

State & Local Government Assistance

Success Story: Spancrete Machinery Corporation

Success Story: Home Instead Senior Care

Plan Your Market Entry Strategy: Foreign Import Regulations

Intellectual Property Considerations

Navigate Your Market Successfully: Protecting your IP Abroad

E-Exporting Tools for Small Businesses

Make the Export Sale: Shipping Basics

Make the Export Sale: Export Pricing Strategy

Success Story: Alignment Simple Solution

Success Story: Patton Electronics Company

Obtaining Assistance from US Embassies and Consulates

Navigate Your Market Successfully: Business Travel Abroad

Success Story: Lightning Eliminators

Selling Overseas and Aftersales Service

Conducting Business Internationally

Rules of Origin – General Categories

NAFTA, Chile, Singapore, Australia, CAFTA-DR, Colombia, Panama, Korea, and Peru FTAs – Determining rules of origin

Rules of Origin General Categories, Chile, Singapore, CAFTA-DR, Peru, Colombia, Korea and Panama FTAs

Rules of Origin: General Categories: Israel, Jordan, Morocco, Bahrain, and Oman FTAs

Make the Export Sale: Shipping Basics

Once you have identified your new foreign buyers, consider how to best ship your goods to international customers efficiently, securely, and legally. Start by checking with a few different international shipping companies to compare costs and available services. Along with their expertise in export forms and shipping documentation, many freight forwarders specialize in certain types of shipments. Also, be sure to familiarize yourself with INCOTERMS, a set of internationally-accepted terms spelling out which parties are responsible for various costs and details throughout the shipping process such as freight, insurance, duties, customs clearance and documentation. Your local U.S. Commercial Service office is also available to assist. Learn more by viewing Shipping Basics, the third of five videos in the Make the Export Sale set.

Quick Links:How to Export Video Series

Tips on International Shipping from U.S.

Now that youve made the export sale, you still have to get the goods to the buyer, who is often located thousands of miles away and where different rules may apply. When shipping overseas, be aware of packing, labeling, documentation, and insurance requirements and regulations. Make sure that the merchandise:

Is packed correctly so it arrives in good condition.

Is labeled correctly to ensure that the goods are handled properly and arrive on time at the right place.

Has correct export documentation for U.S. and foreign-government requirements.

Has insurance to cover any damage, loss, pilferage or delay.

Because of the many considerations involved in physically exporting goods, exporters often receive assistance from their air/ocean carrier or freight forwarder to provide services for these issues and more.

The simplest definition of a freight forwarder is that of a travel agent for freight. International freight forwarders are agents that ship cargo to foreign destinations.These agents should be familiar with the import rules and regulations of foreign countries, U.S. export regulations, different shipping methods and necessary documents. Freight forwarders are licensed by the International Air Transport Association (IATA) to handle air freight and by the Federal Maritime Commission to handle ocean freight.

Freight forwarders may be able to assist exporters in preparing price quotations by advising on freight costs, port charges, consular fees, costs of special documentation, insurance costs and the freight forwarders own handling fees. They may recommend packing methods that will protect the merchandise during transit, or can arrange to have the merchandise packed at the port or put in containers. Freight forwarders may also reserve the necessary space on a vessel, aircraft, train or truck. The cost for their services is a factor that should be included in the price charged to the customer.

Once the goods are ready for transit, freight forwarders should review all export shipping documents to ensure that everything is in order. This review is of particular importance with letter-of-credit payment terms. Freight forwarders may also prepare the bill of lading and any special required documentation, including electronic filing in theAutomated Export System (AES). Freight forwarders can also route the documents to the seller, the buyer, or a paying bank. Freight forwarders can also make arrangements with customs brokers overseas to ensure that the goods comply with foreign import documentation-regulations.

A customs broker is an individual or company that is licensed to transact customs business on behalf of others. Customs business is limited to those activities involving transactions related to the entry and admissibility of merchandise; its classification and valuation; the payment of duties, taxes or other charges assessed or collected; and the refund, rebate or drawback of those charges.

Export.gov, the U.S. federal governments export assistance portal, links to many resources, including the following:

Locate a trade expert and learn about the export services of theU.S. Commercial Servicesglobal office network.

Country Commercial Guidesprovide the latest market intelligence on more than 140 countries from U.S. embassies worldwide.

Export Documentation, the fifth video in the Make the Export Sale video set, provides details on export documentation required for foreign trade.

TheNational Customs Brokers and Freight Forwarders Association of Americacan recommend brokers/members in your area who can assist with shipping specialized products. Some of the larger logistics companies, such as UPS, FedEx, and DHL are also freight forwarders and customs brokers.

Freight ForwardingMake the Export Sale: Shipping BasicsOnce you have identified your new foreign buyers, consider how to best ship your goods to international customers efficiently, securely, and legally. Start by checking with a few different international shipping companies to compare costs and available services. Along with their expertise in export forms and shipping documentation, many freight forwarders specialize in certain types of shipments. Also, be sure to familiarize yourself with INCOTERMS, a set of internationally-accepted terms spelling out which parties are responsible for various costs and details throughout the shipping process such as freight, insurance, duties, customs clearance and documentation. Your local U.S. Commercial Service office is also available to assist. Learn more by viewing Shipping Basics, the third of five videos in the Make the Export Sale set.Pick a Board

TheInternational Trade Administration(ITA),U.S. Department of Commercemanages Export.gov to assist U.S. businesses plan their international sales strategies and succeed in todays global marketplace. External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein. This site contains PDF documents. APDF Readeris available from Adobe Systems Incorporated.